drip

Kickstarter has a new initiative called Drip, a subscription platform to support the creative practice of artists, musicians, authors, designers and theatre and film makers.

In this beginning phase the platform is limited to selected invited artists (in the broad sense of the word artist). Anyone else can become a founding subscribing member of  65 artist’s ‘communities’. When you make a monthly subscription you receive ongoing content that includes process, notes and previews of new work.

You can subscribe for as little as a dollar a month and cancel that subscription at any time. I’ve subscribed to Thomas Negovan’s Century Guild: An exploration of aesthetics and the archaic, 1880-1925. Here is an excerpt of the description of the Century Guild on Drip:

My company Century Guild is primarily a publisher of fine art books on rare artworks from 1880-1925, specifically on the subjects of Art Nouveau, Symbolist Art, and leaning into macabre mysticism…The Century Guild Museum of Art was founded in 1999 and celebrates and illuminates the connections between popular culture and art history…Works from the Century Guild collection have been exhibited at numerous institutions including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, The Detroit Institute of Art, The H.R. Giger Museum, and LACMA.

Subscribing to our DRIP is meant to be “after hours at the museum” and will keep you connected to a steady stream of information on our upcoming and ongoing projects, including a book on cabaret from 1900-1920, the legendary Theatre du Grand-Guignol, and more! I look forward to seeing you inside!

Have a look at Kickstarter’s Drip

 

Random images somewhat related to this post: Maurice Denis, French Symbolist Painter, late 19th-early 20th century

💧💧💧 Day 974/27

The child is why

Inexplicably, I thought about Milly-Molly-Mandy this morning. I was a distracted kid and didn’t like reading much, but I loved Milly-Molly-Mandy.

That thought led me to revisit her life. She was busy, independent and interested in lots of things. My life at her age was similar—I lived in a seaside suburb of Newcastle that may well have been an English village; I had a loving, relatively uncomplicated family; I liked making things; I had enormous freedom and loved exploring outside; I was always finding and scoffing mulberries, loquats, mushrooms, honey suckles and even wild onion grass; I tolerated fishing and adored swimming; I collaborated with friends to make up games and songs; I had to do ‘chores’; I learnt to cook; I looked after and loved my pets; I valued and saved my pennies. I was also bratty but that doesn’t fit into M-M-M’s story.

I’ve been going on for some time about how much I love my simple domestic life; musing about how different it is for me since I retired. Today I realised that this life isn’t new, and the child is why. That M-M-M child is just a sentimental version of my more constructive current self. That M-M-M child is also why I’m doing and making—doing and making up for lost time.

I remember when I was 5 I practiced writing my name in my books. Not just in my books, but also in as many books from the family bookshelf as I could, before getting caught and stopped (bratty kid!). Here’s an example:

It’s a pretty strong statement—a signature of considerable size. Practice made perfect!

Mmm…using my fingers to count that it is Day 984/17 📔😳