A hellish daydream

A hellish daydream

I don’t have any good photos from some of the earlier Rock Eisteddfods we did so have taken some screen grabs from a pretty dodgy quality DVD. I think you still get the gist of the performance. This one was called ‘A hellish daydream’ (1989) and featured a sped-up Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody and an opening scene in black and white which turned into colour. Daniel Parkinson made the great glowing devil head.

It was our first foray into the use of scaffolding and from this moment our sets got bigger and bigger until we stopped at five metres high a few years later. This performance was really the beginning of a power production team of students who worked with me for years. Each performance was so different, depending on the interests and expertise of the students working on it.

You can also see the beginnings of the extremes of make up and hair that became a bit of a Cromer statement. This becomes more obvious as we move into the 90s.

Ballet Sycophantes

Ballet Sycophantes

Ballet Sycophantes

Vicki, Emma and Tasha feature in this shot from Ballet Sycophantes

From 1989 to 1997 I worked collaboratively with students in my dance ensembles to create contemporary and jazz works which we performed at regional and state dance festivals. I owe so much of the success of these works to the spirit of the dancers – Donna, Vicki, Kylie F, Lara, Belynda, Tasha, Paul, Sophie, Tiffany, Kylie C, Elisa, Kelly and Elizabeth – just to name a few. So many others were instrumental in musicals and Rock Eisteddfods, but that is for another post.

Ballet Sycophantes was one of my favourite works, not least because of the bum wiggle which (if memory serves correctly) was included in the dance after Tasha got bored and was doing her own impro to the music (Ode to Joy), throwing in her bum wiggles to the music. That moment shifted the whole concept to a parody, which was well-recieved by audiences.